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 Carla is a Teacher of Latin in Heathdale Christian College. In 2013, she finished first-class Honours in Classics, writing a thesis on accusations of impiety among philosophers in Greece and Republican Rome. She loves ancient art, ancient history, theology and pretty much anything to do with the Romans.

She goes to an Anglican church in the city which assembles in a movie theatre every Sunday, and she hangs out with a small study group every Tuesday.

Drop a message, write a comment, she loves hearing from you.


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25 responses »

  1. Hi, a very good blog, yours, and it seems we share similar interests. I didn’t reply to your intriguing comment on the ‘decline’ of the empire because I blog very little now and am mostly into music at present. But I always thought I would have replied to you, sooner or later. Keep up the good work!
    Man of Roma

    Reply
    • Thank you! I’m glad to hear you liked my blog. Your post about the ‘fall’ of Rome was really thought provoking, and I hoped I could add something on top of the many other very interesting responses.

      Reply
  2. Very unique blog. I happen to be a fan of historical Christianity. I plan on being back to muse upon your cogitation. 🙂

    Reply
  3. This is such a good response to the myth of ancient Romans being able to draw in perspective. Linear perspective is a complex method of realist representation. We have Brunelleschi’s history and method, along with verification of his fellow artists (notably Uccello) and centuries of expansion and polish to prove there is a standard for true linear perspective.

    Thanks so much for this article. It clarifies and exposes wrong-thinking in art/architecture.

    Reply
  4. how do I get on your mailing list?

    Reply
    • There should be a small grey box in the lower right hand corner that says “Follow” – if you click it, you can enter in your email address and it will keep you updated. 🙂

      Reply
  5. Hello,

    I am a beginner in Latin, having studied Hebrew and Arabic. I have a fairly superficial question. I noticed from the offerings in the Harvard Loeb Classical Library that there are so many more titles in Greek than in Latin. That gave me the impression that there is not a whole lot of Latin to be read. Is there any historical reason for the overwhelming availability of Greek titles compared with Latin? Thanks so much.

    Reply
  6. Hi Carla,
    I was wondering if I could use your image about European Mustelids: Size and colour on my website. It’s in this blog post: https://foundinantiquity.com/2013/10/28/the-weasel-in-antiquity-pet-or-pest/
    I’m creating a blog about wildlife and nature, so not really close to your niche. But if I’m allowed to use it, I will make sure there is a link in the description. Currently, my blog is still offline, but I included my old blog that I’m renewing at the moment.
    All the best,
    Sam

    Reply
  7. Hi Carla,

    I was wondering if I could use your image about European Mustelids: Size and colour on my website. It’s in this blog post: https://foundinantiquity.com/2013/10/28/the-weasel-in-antiquity-pet-or-pest/
    I’m creating a blog about wildlife and nature, so not really close to your niche. But if I’m allowed to use it, I will make sure there is a link in the description. Currently, my blog is still offline, but I included my old blog that I’m renewing at the moment.
    All the best,
    Sam

    Reply
  8. Dale E Lichtblau

    Hi Carla:
    Enjoyed your blog on tenses, “When English outdoes Ancient Greek in precision.” But are the twelve English tenses you “demonstrate in the table” really the best way to compare Greek and English? I cringe when faced with over 60 Ancient Greek verb forms, from the 1st sing. pres. ind. act. to the 1st perf. opt, pass. I’ve read (somewhere, I believe) that Oscar Wilde loved Greek because of its expressiveness (not necessarily its precision). According to Thomas Wright, “Wilde displayed a preference for Greek language and literature over Latin” and “loved the luminous quality of the language.” “Unlike Latin, Greek was…unencumbered with the baggage of cultural imperialism and the suppression of nationalist vernaculars.” (Build of Books, pp. 48-49)
    Best regards,
    Dale Lichtblau

    Reply
    • I agree, Greek is not just about learning verb forms, as there is a whole wealth of language beyond that step. But in my experience I’ve heard people fixate on verb tenses as an example of precision, maybe because it is one of the first things they learned or they never got to properly master the language as a whole and it still seems mysterious and untouchable to them. I hear a lot of English natives speak very contemptuously of their native language while learning a second language, because they never had to consciously learn the intricacies of their native language and just can’t see that their own language is also very expressive in different ways, so I wanted to give some perspective on how English functionally expresses many similarly complicated nuances of aspect and time, just with more words rather than with endings.

      Reply
  9. Hi Carla,
    Do you teach Latin?

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  10. Hi Carla, Some time ago, I read the article about perspective in antiquity, and I saw your diagram on the zone where perspective makes sense. It is by far the clearest diagram I’ve ever seen on the problem.
    I’m an artist and have been wrestling with perspective and curved space for a long time. See my stuff @stevezolinart and http://www.stevezolin.com. I’ve been also writing a paper about the history of curved perspective in art (there isn’t a single one that I can find). I’m looking for people interested in the topic to converse with. Also, can I use your diagram in my paper?
    Regards, Steve Zolin

    Reply
  11. Laureline Gallagher

    Is this site still active?

    Reply
  12. Dear Carla,

    Through the internet I came across a chart you used in one of your articles (European Mustelids: size and colour). I wonder if you are the creator and if I can use it for a citizen-science project involving Mustelids in The Netherlands. Hope to hear from you!

    Cheers,

    Kelly

    Reply
  13. Could you please suggest resources for an adult who wants to learn Latin?

    Reply
  14. Hi Carla, we’re so honored by your blog about our Aleph with Beth series! It’s the most thoughtful, articulate writeup we’ve seen so far, and we’re really grateful and encouraged! Also, by the way, we created a new Lesson 1 video that is higher quality and a better first impression for those getting a taste of our content for the first time, so if you ever get a chance it’d be great if you could replace the old link on your blog post 😉 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y640-FIpxQs&t=4s Thanks again, and we feel like we’ve made a new friend!

    Reply
    • Yes absolutely, I’ll replace the link! I’m glad you liked my write-up and very grateful for your creativity and hard work in making such a joyful Hebrew series.

      Reply
  15. Are you on the Latin Discord servers? Also please consider setting up a Patreon so your fans can contribute to more Youtube content, your most recent songs and Minecraftus Latin videos are exceptional and I would contribute to receiving regular content like this in my feed. If you did online classes as well I would sign up in a heartbeat. I have been regularity singing along Florisculli.

    Reply

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