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Tag Archives: language

Launching a new Ancient Greek YouTube channel

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As I’ve been making more Ancient Greek language videos on my Latin channel, it has become increasingly clear that it is best if these Greek videos have their own home on a dedicated channel for Ancient Greek content. So now I’m launching a new channel for Ancient Greek comprehensible input – Found in Antiquity: Ancient Greek! I’ll be posting new Greek videos and moving my old Greek content over. There’s only about a dozen videos on it at the moment but in the coming time you’ll see more.

Separating my Latin and Greek content into two channels was not a light decision to make, given the historical links between the languages. Ultimately it came down to what best represented the learners and audience. As I stated in my previous post, 12 Reasons why Latinists are not learning Ancient Greek, not everyone who learns Latin learns Ancient Greek, and vice versa.

I want my content to be focused on helping as many people in their language journeys as possible, and that includes people who only do one of the ancient languages without the other. As a result, I do not expect Greek students to have mastered Latin or vice versa, so I do not structure my Greek content to expect a progression from Latin –> Greek with prerequisite knowledge carried over from Latin.

If you’re interested, there’s a more in-depth discussion of my reasons for splitting the languages into two channels in this video: 

I’m excited to be contributing more story-based learning and comprehensible input videos to the Ancient Greek learner community and I hope this channel will help many people on their language journeys, wherever you currently are.

Aeneid poster for sale, and other merch!

I’ve opened a merch shop for Found in Antiquity, to support my YouTube channel and my work in creating more comprehensible input in Latin and Ancient Greek!

Aeneid Poster

I’ve just started adding products, but let me show you this pretty poster:

These are the first 11 lines of the Aeneid, the epic poem about the Trojan hero Aeneas’ quest to bring his people to Italy and establish a new city which will be the precursor to Rome.

The first 11 lines serve as an introduction to all the main themes of the epic: War, human suffering, the will of fate and the schemes of the gods, the wrath of Juno, and the piety of Aeneas.

Almost every Latin word is illustrated with a little picture to represent the meaning of that word, forming a kind of interlinear with Latin and illustrations.

Every time you look at this poster on your wall, you can relive the opening moments of the Aeneid and immerse yourself in 100% Latin without looking at side notes or a translation.

I made this resource as a memory aid to remembering the meanings of words after the whole meaning of the sentences has been understood. I wouldn’t recommend using this as a means to understand the text for a first time reading it, as it will only help with individual words and not with how the words fit together.

The high definition colour version is being sold as a poster, but I’m also releasing a black and white version of the poster for free as a pdf in case you’re a teacher who’d like to print it out as a class handout. Here’s the black and white pdf:

Shirts and Hoodies

I also made a couple shirts and hoodies with the Found In Antiquity logo and the Minecraftium logo:

Spreadshirt lets you choose your base colour, so you can customise your shirt or hoodie colours to whatever matches your style.

Miscellaneous merch

Tucked away in the menus, there’s also a mug:

And a tote bag:

Each with customisable base colours too.

Let me know what other options of merch you’d like to see, and I’ll be happy to add them! I like creating art and design, so I’m looking forward to coming up with more T-shirts, posters, and mug designs in the future, especially if the design incorporates a lot of Latin that can aid in Latin immersion.

Septimus: a Latin novella from the 1930s

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Septimus: A First Latin Reader, by R. L. Chambers and K. D. Robinson.

Septimus: A First Latin Reader, by R. L. Chambers and K. D. Robinson.

My neighbour Pat has recently given me her Latin textbook, a 1950s reprint of a beautiful 1930s classic, which may actually have been the forerunner of a revolution in Latin textbooks. First published in 1936, it is titled Septimus, not because it is the seventh book in a series, but for its main character, a young British schoolboy named Septimus. When I first received the book, it was wrapped in the kind of thin brown paper that old parcels used to be covered in. I suspected that the greasy, battered brown paper was hiding something beautiful underneath, and on removing the paper I was not disappointed. As you can see above, the original cover design is perfectly preserved in yellow, green and red.

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On the merits of learning German

Happy news! I’ve just started learning German! I signed up for a super-intensive course (with the Goethe Institute, Melbourne) that runs all day each day from Monday to Friday this week.

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There are so many good reasons to learn German if you like Classics. Perhaps you’ve realised everyone is citing German academics. Name any topic on Greece and Rome, and some German mastermind somewhere has written an immensely important monograph work on that very area. Mention this to anyone who isn’t a Classicist and they’ll reply with a slightly confused “huh?” and ask what Germany has to do with the Romans and Greeks anyway. Good question.

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Far too many Latin words for kill

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Far too many Latin words for kill

How many words does Latin have for kill? One of the quirky, somewhat morbid attractions of Latin is that it has many, many words for kill. If you’ve ever studied Latin, you’ll probably remember interficere and necāre, two very classic verbs for kill. But it seems that the more literature you read, the more creative the language gets when it talks about killing. As far as I’m aware, no one on the internet has yet attempted to compile a list of Latin verbs meaning “to kill” longer than about five or six words, or tried to convey a sense of their shades of meaning. So! After much sifting through Perseus’ Latin word study tool, I have here thirty-three words where “kill” is either a primary or a secondary meaning. I’ve also tried to give a potted history of each word, and a little taste of their semantic range.

Feast your deadly curiosity!

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A word in Latin

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fritillus, -ī m dice box.

Example sentence:

Marcus shook the dice box again. “Argh!” he said. “The lowest roll possible!”

Marcus iterum fritillum iecit. “Heu!” inquit. “Canis!”

A word in Latin

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pūnītor, -ōris m avenger.

Example sentence:

“Have you seen the new Avengers movie?”
“No, I haven’t even seen the first one.”

“vidistine pelilculam cinematographicam novam ‘Punitores’?”
“immo, peliculam cinematographicam primam etiam non vidi.”